Sunday Salon with CPR Artists-in-Residence

Free admission. $5 donation encouraged at door (cash only). image (clockwise from top left): Kimberly Bartosik, Beth Gill, Meredith Glisson (credit Ian Douglas), Lauren […]
January 8 at 2pm
CPR
361 Manhattan Avenue, Brooklyn

Free admission. $5 donation encouraged at door (cash only).

image (clockwise from top left): Kimberly Bartosik, Beth Gill, Meredith Glisson (credit Ian Douglas), Lauren Bakst

Sunday Salons are a new series of gatherings featuring the work, research materials, and ephemera of CPR’s Artists-in-Residence. Free and open to the public, join us for an afternoon of conversation and mingling punctuated by performances and artist interventions. This month, witness work by Lauren Bakst, Kimberly Bartosik, Beth Gill, and Meredith Glisson.

Doors and Gallery Open at 2pm

2:30pm: Kimberly Bartosik in Theater
3pm: Lauren Bakst in Gallery
3:30pm: Meredith Glisson in Theater
4pm: Lauren Bakst in Gallery
4:30pm: Beth Gill in Theater
5pm: Open Gallery

For Dimensional Lumber, Lauren Bakst will use CPR’s gallery as her work room—a site for the excavation of action, image, and object materials. Kimberly Bartosik will show Ecsteriority4 (Part 2) in the theater, as well as display in-process ephemera in the CPR gallery. Ecsteriority4 (Part 2) is a 32-minute dance constructed within a landscape of power and desire, where irrational impulses create a feeling of urgency and the inevitability of violation. There is no resolution in this dance. It happens, and then it’s over, and, like violence, the act is instantaneous while the remnants never disappear. Beth Gill will present an excerpt from her new evening length work in the theater, with longtime collaborators Jon Moniaci (composer) and Thomas Dunn (visual and lighting design). The work is co-commissioned by the Walker Art Center, the American Dance Festival and The Yard. Meredith Glisson will present IS HERE | SHE in the theater. IS HERE | SHE is a choreographed performance work consisting of three female figures that shift from individually representing themselves to being understood as the same person. Through this method of transference the three female figures come to negotiate who they are not, in order to understand their identity through their own absence.