Sunday Salon with CPR Artists-in-Residence

Free admission. $5 donation encouraged at door (cash only). Sunday Salons are a new series of gatherings featuring the work, research materials, and ephemera of CPR’s Artists-in-Residence. Free and open to […]
September 24, 2017 at 2pm
CPR
361 Manhattan Ave.

Free admission. $5 donation encouraged at door (cash only).

Sunday Salons are a new series of gatherings featuring the work, research materials, and ephemera of CPR’s Artists-in-Residence. Free and open to the public, join us for an afternoon of conversation and mingling punctuated by performances and artist interventions. This month, witness work by Anna Sperber, Abigail Levine, Moriah Evans, and Gwen Welliver with Stuart Singer.

Doors and Gallery Open at 2pm

2:30pm: Moriah Evans in Theater

3pm: Abigail Levine in Gallery

3:30pmAnna Sperber in Theater

4pm: Abigail Levine in Gallery

4:30pmGwen Welliver with Stuart Singer in Theater

5pm: Open Gallery

Anna Sperber presents Wealth From The Salt Seas (working title) solo material exploring a reciprocal relationship between somatic experience and external environment. It is interested in the interplay between receptivity and the agency of a solo female body to take direct action and create change in the surrounding space.

8 Gestures is an evolving evening-length work by Abigail Levine with collaborators to date Paula Matthusen, Cleek Schrey, Judith Berkson, and Kristopher K.Q. Pourzal. The work is a modular choreography whose parts can be selected and arranged for different performance spaces and situations. 8 Gestures is a dance of marking time, each of eight sections acting as a container for different ways of experiencing and measuring the passage of time.

Moriah Evans shows Episodes and Fragments.

“Our struggle then must begin with the re-appropriation of our body, the revaluation and rediscovery of its capacity for resistance, and expansion and celebration of its powers, individual and collective.
Dance is central to this re-appropriation. In essence, the act of dancing is an exploration and invention of what a body can do: of its capacities, its languages, its articulations of the strivings of our being. I have come to believe that there is a philosophy in dancing, for dance mimics the process by which we relate to the world, connect with other bodies, transform ourselves and the space around us.
From dance we learn that matter is not stupid, it is not blind, it is not mechanical, but has its rhythms, has its language, and it is self-activated and self-organizing. Our bodies have reasons that we need to learn, rediscover, reinvent. We need to listen to their language as the path to our health and healing, as we need to listen the language and rhythms of the natural world as the path to the health and heal thing of the earth. Since the power to be affected and to affect, to be moved and move, a capacity which is indestructible, exhausted only with death, is constitutive of the body, there is an immanent politics residing in its capacity to transform itself, others and change the world.” —Silvia Federici “In Praise of the Dancing Body”

Gwen Welliver and Stuart Singer’s Diptych Duets (working excerpts) works with live performance, digitized drawing, performance on video, and working-process scenes on video.